Articles and Insights About Wearables for Clinical Trials

Articles by Jen Blankenship

Jen Blankenship

Jen Blankenship, PhD. is a clinical and translational scientist with a deep interest in wearable technology (e.g., continuous glucose monitors and accelerometers).

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Recent Articles


Opportunities for Real-World Measures in Alzheimer's Research

Posted by Jen Blankenship on November 23, 2022

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that progresses to impact every dimension of a patient’s life. With no cure and limited options to manage symptoms, research is underway to develop drugs that impact the most burdensome aspects of AD: memory problems and the ability to function independently.

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Measuring Physical Function and Mobility in Real World Settings

Posted by Jen Blankenship on November 4, 2022

Physical function and mobility are relevant to virtually all clinical indications and are significant determinants of an individual’s quality of life. Because of this, function and mobility are often assessed in clinical trials using subjective questionnaires or in-clinic performance tests, but these assessments may not reflect a patient’s lived experience. Wearable sensors provide an opportunity to move assessments of function into the real world to measure how patients feel and function in their everyday environments.

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Understanding Neurodegenerative Diseases with Wearable Sensors

Posted by Jen Blankenship on November 4, 2021

Millions of people across the globe struggle with neurodegenerative diseases every day. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by a breakdown of the central and peripheral nervous systems and cause progressive deterioration of a normally functioning human body. However, a significant challenge in studying neurodegenerative diseases is that direct measurements of neurological systems are invasive and expensive.

Wearable sensors can be used to understand disease progression and manifestation by measuring physical symptoms and physiological outcomes.

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